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Twi'lek Pam

Resin Casting Tutorial

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Any chance a tutorial for using Resin is in the works?

 

 

Pretty please!!!!! :D

]

 

 

Uhm, well, I took a series of resin casting photos for a tutorial, and I stored them in a folder around here... uh.... somewhere...

 

I had to set the tutorials project aside for a while so I could finish the mad-dash to get some new costumes ready for C4, but I can help you out. Casting in resin is quite easy as long as the design is simple. (When you get into larger pieces and undercuts, that's when it gets more complicated and you start wishing for/needing a pressure pot.)

 

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- Start by figuring out how much resin you're going to need. Fill your mold with some water, measuring to find out how much water it takes. That'll keep you from mixing way too much or too little resin. I usually write the amount on the side of the mold with a sharpie so I'll remember it later. I usually mix a little more resin than the measurement, just in case any is lost to a small spill, and so that I don't have to waste time tryping to scrape every last drop out of my mixing cups.

 

- After thoroughly drying your mold, spray it with a mold release. (I use Universal Mold Release, which I get from Smooth-On.) Even if it's a silicone mold, you should still use a release. It'll lengthen the life of the mold, and will make it a lot easier to pop out your casting afterwards. If the release tells you to brush it in, do so carefully. Sometimes brush marks can be left on the mold, which then transfer to your casting.

 

-Measure out the two parts of the resin according to the directions that come with it. The amounts and measurement style varies by brand and resin type. Some you just mix 50-50 by volume, while others need an accurate scale and might have a 30-70 mix, etc. To save your measuring cups, it's best to first measure the amounts with water. For example, say you need to mix 3/4 cup of Part A with 3/4 cup of Part B. Instead of getting resin in your good measuring cups, measure 3/4 cup of water and pour it into a plastic drinking cup. Use a sharpie to mark the water level. Do the same thing with the other cup. Then pour out the water and dry the cups. Now you have a pair of disposable measuring cups which can double as mixing cups.

 

- Many resins kick VERY fast, so pay attention to what the directions say about mixing time. Alumilite, for example, will kick in less than a minute. You can't waste time once you put the two components in the same cup! Pour, mix, and into the mold it goes! Other resins, such as some of the Smooth-On types, take a few minutes or even a few hours to set.

 

- Pour the resin into the lowest part of the mold, if you can, and allow it to spread up over the details of the mold. That will reduce problems with air bubbles getting trapped. If you have problems with air bubbles getting trapped in your mold, it helps to have someone vibrating the table while you pour, such as by tapping the table next to your mold with a rubber mallet or a heavy book. Tipping the mold from side to side if there are undercuts can also help release air bubbles that get trapped.

 

- The resin will cure via a chemical reaction, so it will get very hot. Don't touch! Allow the mold to sit undisturbed until the resin has had a chance to solidify. It's best to let it sit until it starts cooling, because even after it has kicked, it will still be a bit flexible. Handling it too soon can warp your casting out of shape.

 

Hope that helps! If you have any questions, just ask. (And I promise, a better tutorial with accompanying pictures will be added to the boards.... eventually!)

 

Pam :-)

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Guest Cleverlilminx

Hey Pam that's awesome and to be honest faster then I expected.

 

 

Thank you very much.

 

I plan on making a new Nihilus mask in the next few weeks so these tutorials have been a HUGE help to me.

 

 

Now go get ready for CIV!!!! :D

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Hey Pam that's awesome and to be honest faster then I expected.

 

 

Thank you very much.

 

I plan on making a new Nihilus mask in the next few weeks so these tutorials have been a HUGE help to me.

 

 

Now go get ready for CIV!!!! :D

 

Welcome!

 

Although, for making a mask... I would recommend that you should use fiberglass rather than just a casting resin. You would get a mask that is stronger, lighter, less inclined to crack, and considerably thinner. Of course, I don't think I've posted a fiberglass tutorial yet... I'll get to that later tonight. (Remind me if I don't!)

 

::runs back to her half-molded lekku sculpt::

 

Pam :-)

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Guest Cleverlilminx

Hmmm... Fiberglass...

 

 

Now is that something I pour into a mold or brush in or use those fiberglass sheets?

 

 

I swear fiberglass confuses me... :lol:

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Guest Darth Revan
Hmmm... Fiberglass...

 

 

Now is that something I pour into a mold or brush in or use those fiberglass sheets?

 

 

I swear fiberglass confuses me... :lol:

 

The short answer is YES!

 

The longer answer is two fold:

 

You can use a slush mixture of resin and lose fiberglass fibers. You need to gell coat the mould and then as it sets up you start "slushing" the slush mixture.

 

Or you can use fiberglass mats. You brush on a coat of resin and lay a mat on top and then brush on a coat a resin. Repeat. :wink:

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